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The Etiquette Grrls' Q & A Archive: January 2003

Dear Etiquette Grrls,

Christmas Day I hosted the family party. It is our practice to buy gifts for the children only. My brother's daughters, who are married with children, gave gifts to my children and I gave gifts to their children. My sister's daughters, who are married with children, did not give my children any gifts this year, but had previous years. I gave their children gifts. These two nieces gave gifts to every child at the party except mine. All the other adults brought gift for all (5) of the children attending the party. I feel very hurt that my two nieces overlooked my children. My children are twelve and fourteen years old and my grandnieces are ages six and under. We never discussed an age cutoff for gift giving.

I sent an e-mail to one of my nieces asking if perhaps she might have given a gift that was misplaced as the gift opening was a "free for all" and I truly thought something got lost. I never received a response from her. Did my nieces lack social grace?

J.

Dear Etiquette Grrls, At our family Christmas parties all the adults give gifts to the children. I brought gifts for all the children there ages 6 and under but this year but I decided not to give to my aunt's children who are 12 and 14 as I thought there has to be an age cut off somewhere. I did not mention my new policy to my aunt. My sister also decided not to give our cousins gifts; however her children did receive gifts from their grandaunt. (I don't have children as I am still looking for that perfect husband.) I did notice my sister and I were the only adults at the party that did not give gifts to these two cousins. I got an e-mail from my aunt asking if perhaps my gifts were misplaced. I ignored it. Because my aunt left me an e-mail I discussed this with a couple of close friends and they thought I was wrong to not give gifts to my cousins especially when my aunt was hosting the party. My aunt and I were developing a nice relationship through e-mail and now we haven't exchanged any since. Now I am wondering, perhaps I committed a faux pas? Please advise me as to what I should do, if anything.

Wondering Niece

Dear J. and Wondering Niece,

Wow. The EGs don't often hear from Opposing Parties! Perhaps we should let Our Dear Readers have it out more often here! It would be kind of like Jerry Springer, but with Smarter Guests and Delicious Hors d'Oeuvres! We can see the Stickley Chairs flying! Tee hee!

Dear Readers-- yes, we think Wondering Niece was In The Wrong Here. Many families decide that at some point, an Age Cutoff becomes necessary for Christmas Gift Exchanges. But usually, when this is done, it's something the family discusses, and everyone is aware of it. We think the issue is not so much that Wondering Niece and one of her sisters decided to have an Age Cutoff, but that there was no Advance Discussion of this, and the 12- and 14-year-olds were probably Rather Confused at the Christmas Party. And, Wondering Niece, we're not trying to be Unduly Harsh here, but your aunt's e-mail was probably a good chance for you to explain why you didn't bring gifts (even though, at this late date, that would still have been Less Than Ideal-- but at least you could have Explained Yourself and Apologized for the lack of Advance Discussion). It wasn't good to ignore it. Wondering Niece-- you need to call your aunt and Make Peace. And J., please see from this that your niece is beginning to realize this wasn't the Best Approach to Take-- which is Important. So, c'mon, you two, have a Long Talk, and Make Amends. You will both feel Much Better.

Cheers,
The Etiquette Grrls

P.S. May we just say, when we first read J's question, we thought we were in for a Logic Problem with all the ages and relationships! We were having GRE Flashbacks! (Not that the EGs disliked the Logic Problem section of the GREs. We loved that section! We lived for that section! We hear it's been discontinued in favor of some sort of Handwritten Essay-- Quel, Quel Dommage!)

martini

Dear Etiquette Grrls,

First, I would like to take a moment to thank you for your wonderful site. It is definitely one of the things that keeps my sanity intact and my sense of humor in good form. I think you are wonderful.

I will be getting married in a few months and a certain person has me very confused. Initially, she invited herself into my wedding party, and since I did not wish to hurt her feelings or cause a possible rift in our friendship I simply included her in the bridal party plans. This bridesmaid promptly dropped out of my wedding a month later, indicating that she had other things to spend her money on. A few weeks later she stated she would make the time for my wedding and would be a bridesmaid again. About six months later, she dropped out of the wedding again with a very rude e-mail rather than speaking with me in person. Alarmed, I asked my other bridesmaids if I have been an overly demanding bride or done something that would deserve such behavior. My other bridesmaids and maid of honor have all assured me that I have been considerate and anything but demanding, and that they are having a wonderful time participating.

Now, this person has been asking about my wedding plans again and going on and on about the wedding she is planning for herself. The source of my confusion, aside from her blunt requests for how much I will be spending on each detail of my wedding, is that she has been happily married for four years. I think she is referring to a renewal of vows, but she specifically refers to it as a wedding.

How do I fend off her questions about the money I am spending and hints about rejoining the bridal party again? And how do I avoid conversations about her wedding or renewal of vows, or whatever it might be? I do not wish to be rude or argumentative, but I am both confused and reluctant to go through all of this again.

A Very Confused Bride

Dear Very Confused Bride,

The on-again, off-again Bridesmaid Friend sounds like she's Psycho, in Our Expert Opinion. A few observations:

1) One does not invite oneself into a Wedding Party. If one is not Asked, one Deals With It like a Big Girl. (Corollary: If one is a Bride-to-Be, and someone tries to invite herself into your Wedding Party, you're better off Saying No. It will save you a Lot of Grief.)

2) One does not Drop Out of a Wedding Party unless one has a Very, Very, VERY Good Reason.

3) If one should have to Drop Out of a Wedding Party, one does not invite oneself back into the Wedding Party if one has a Change of Heart.

4) One does not ask a Bride how much the wedding is going to cost.

5) For that matter, one does not ask ANYONE how much ANYTHING costs. People who are Nosy About Money can See Us In Hell!

6) When one has been married for Only Four Years, one is Not Allowed to Renew One's Vows. Period. It's one thing if a Sweet Older Couple wishes to do so on their Fiftieth or Sixtieth Anniversary, and to have a Small Celebration afterwards for their Family and Friends, but after FOUR YEARS? No. Not Permissible. (Need you ask what the EGs think about Certain Pop Stars renewing their vows after just TWO YEARS of Marriage?! Not Permissible! Please, InStyle magazine, do not encourage This Sort of Thing!)

Dear Reader, honestly, isn't it time to Be Rid of This Friend? If she's acting this horrible, and has put you through This Much Already, we say it's time to be Perpetually Busy. (After all, if you're planning Your Wedding, you probably are Perpetually Busy.) Of course, if you're somewhere and you can't avoid her, you can Fend Off her Nosy Inquiries: "Oh, it's so tiresome to talk about Money" (repeat Ad Nauseam). And you can Change the Subject, or take the opportunity to Go Get a Fresh Drink, if she won't shut up about this Pseudo-Wedding if you're both at a Cocktail Party. But really, we think the best step would be to Minimize Contact With Her.

Best wishes,
The Etiquette Grrls

P.S. Thank you for saying such nice things about Our Site! We appreciate them so much.

martini

Dear Etiquette Grrls,

First of all, congratulations on your book. I loved it!

My question is about thank you notes. I overheard someone mention that it is crass to use notes that are decorated with "thank you" on the front of them and are blank for one to fill in on the inside. Is this true? I am a stickler about writing thank-yous for any gifts received and admit I have used this style of card. Have I been wrong all this time? I would love to hear your comments on this matter.

Thanks!
N.

Dear N.,

We're glad you liked TYNTBT! In answer to your question: First of all, make no mistake, if the choice is between a Thank-You Note written on a card that says "Thank You" on the front and No Thank-You Note At All, the card that says "Thank You" on the front wins. However, the EGs are Traditionalists, and we think that a thank-you note on a Plain Notecard just Looks More Appropriate. After all, your own words of thanks IN the note should make it Perfectly Clear that the Note is, In Fact, a Note of Thanks.

Sincerely yours,
The Etiquette Grrls

Dear Etiquette Grrls,

I came home yesterday and had just put my bag down. My niece (age 8) walks by without a greeting and tells me that I have to give her $10 for a school contest for which her mother (my sister) signed me up as a sponsor. I was shocked and told her gently that her mother never asked me to sponsor her for anything. Her reply was that it was "too late" and that at least I wasn't as bad as her Grandpa, who "owed" $12. My brother "owes" something too. What do you think of this? Are we under any obligation? I would have sponsored her if they had asked first, but now that they had a definite pledge and a dollar amount, I feel that this is just wrong.

How would you guys handle this one?

Thanks so much!
Ling

Dear Ling,

Well, first we'd probably Faint; then we'd probably need a few Restorative Drinks and a Weekend at a Spa to get over it.

But after all of that, we'd Have a Word with Your Sister. And of course we wouldn't Fork Over the Cash. It's absolutely wrong to "Sign Up" someone to sponsor anyone for anything without Asking Them First! It's too bad if this leaves your sister (or her Rude Little Girl) with Egg On Her Face at school, but Tough Cookies. We think Grandpa and Your Brother should do the same.

Yours truly,
The Etiquette Grrls

martini

Dear Etiquette Grrls,

I am in a dilemma! I have been given the honor of working with a professor in my department on his newest research, and honor which is rarely accorded to poor undergraduates. However, I have been invited to lunch with him and several other professors to discuss this project. I am quite terrified of the prospect, as Professor #1 is known as the university's culinary artiste. Please give me some guidance in this situation!

Thanks ever,

Rebecca

Dear Rebecca,

Ne fret pas! It will all be fine! You should be very proud to be included-- just bring your Best Table Manners, be willing to Try any New and Different Foods you may encounter, Relax, and enjoy yourself!

Very truly yours,
The Etiquette Grrls

martini

Dear Ladies,

I must attend an outdoor wedding in April, and I hate wearing frou-frou dresses and lace. I am also not big on color. I recently bought a little black dress and would like to know: is this is appropriate to wear at such an event?

Thanks,
Rebeca

Dear Rebeca,

The EGs have always maintained that Black is Inappropriate for Weddings. And Dear Reader, the EGs LOVE black, especially Little Black Dresses (L.B.D.s). However, a wedding is a Happy Occasion, and a black dress just doesn't jibe with that. Black is a color usually associated with Rather Solemn Social Occasions, such as Funerals. (This is not to say anyone is allowed to prance into a Funeral wearing a Sleek L.B.D. Good God, no. It's not a Cocktail Party. This is what Black Suits Are For.) However, by no means do you need to run out and buy some Hideously Bright Hot-Pink Ensemble! What about Periwinkle Blue in a matte-finish fabric? It's subtle and flatters nearly everyone. Or a lovely Pale Dove Grey? Spring Clothes are arriving in the shops even now (despite the fact that in New England, it is Disgustingly Cold Out)... you have plenty of time before April to find the Perfect Outfit! (We would also recommend getting some sort of Little Jacket, or Wrap, to go with whatever you wear. An Outdoor Wedding in April can be Un Peu Chilly in most parts of the country!)

Very truly yours,
The Etiquette Grrls

martini

Dear Etiquette Grrls,

I received an odd gift of indoor soccer shoes from a rather persistent guy friend. I have been very clear with him that I am not interested in a relationship, but he won't really let up. He hasn't mentioned anything about being more than friends lately, but for Christmas he gave me a pair of shoes. Should I keep them? I actually could use them... but I don't want to give him the wrong idea... or make him feel that the gift will eventually land him a date.

Not Looking for a Beau

Dear Not Looking for a Beau,

Well, naturally, who couldn't use a pair of Indoor Soccer Shoes? The Etiquette Grrls are always remarking how ours Wear Out So Fast! We could use some new Skateboard Wheels, come to think of it. And some Snowboarding Gear, and Bike Helmets. Tee hee!

We think you could safely Go Ahead and Keep the shoes... we'd be more worried he was interested in a Relationship if he gave you, say, a Swell Little Bauble in a Pretty Blue Box, but this sounds Rather Innocuous (albeit, as you say, Odd). And at this point, if you've kept them since Christmas, it might be Un Peu Odd to send them back to him. We'd simply send a thank-you note (holding back on any sort of gushing, of course, and perhaps making a pointed reference like, "I really appreciate your friendship, Basil").

Cheers,
The Etiquette Grrls

martini


Dear Etiquette Grrls,

My sister-in-law recently requested the receipts for two Christmas gifts our family gave her twin 12-year-old girls. She states that the pocketbooks are too small for the girls to use at school where they are only allowed pouches to carry their belongings. I personally selected the pocketbooks for them to use whenever, not specifically for school. How should I respond?

Miffed Auntie

Dear Miffed Auntie,

Well, that depends upon How Much Fuss You Want To Cause. Fuss is not always A Bad Thing, but since the EGs don't know Your Family, you'll have to make that call. You have two options: You could decide simply to Hand Over the Receipts-- perhaps without comment, or with a slightly snippy note: "Here you go. I hope the girls have as much fun shopping for Replacements as I did picking out these handbags especially for them." Or, you could Withhold the Receipts: "I'm so sorry, but I don't have the receipts... I'm sorry that the girls cannot use them at school, but I do hope they'll come in handy for Other Occasions." It is true that many Schools These Days have regulations about what sorts of Bags students may carry, so we don't think she's Just Making That Up, but we agree with you, they must be able to use them Somewhere. They're Handbags-- it's not as if they Don't Fit!

Which brings the EGs to a subject we think is Very Important. Young People need to learn that Some Gifts are just Not Going to Be Useful, or Exactly What They Would Have Chosen for Themselves-- and no matter what you think of something, you Must Write a Nice Thank-you Note. If you want to return it or exchange it, you do so All On Your Own, without having Your Mother Call Up the Person who Gave It To You Demanding the Receipt! And you keep Silent As the Grave about it! If it's something you Can't Return, for whatever reason, you must learn to Deal With This! **Sigh** All we can say, Dear Reader, is that at least Your Nieces didn't Register for Christmas Gifts at Abercrombie and Fitch... this year...

Yours sincerely,
The Etiquette Grrls

martini


Dear Etiquette Grrls,

First off, bravo, and thank you for your dedication to sharing the values that my sisters, husband, friends, and I hold so dear. I stumbled upon your site just yesterday, quite luckily, as I have a question regarding how much a young lady should, and should not reveal, regarding the most intimate (and unconventional) decisions she and her husband have agreed upon.

Until recently my wonderful husband of one year (and friend of many years) and I enjoyed dressing in smart suits together in the morning, working hard all day, and showing up after the workday together at our favorite watering hole for (REAL) martinis. We rarely cooked at home, save for the evenings that we threw shindigs that went down in history. We became well known "perfect couple", with our classic style, our sweet cottage, our ski haus in Vermont, and our adorable "EV' as well as my darling little convertible. None of these were EVER as important to us, as a couple, as one another's happiness.

Three weeks ago, with no prior warning, my husband was laid off along with a number of coworkers. We are both 29 years old and are by no means upset, as we know that this type of thing happens all over our Great Nation every day.

We are in no danger of jeopardizing the ownership of any of our material positions, if we must survive on my salary alone. Of course do plan to eventually return to our previous way of life in order to continue to work towards our long-term goals.

I have come, however, to love our current arrangement. My sweet husband has been able to make some lovely improvements to our home, help our neighbors with theirs, and spend more time with my beloved horse and our sweet birds. In addition, every day I come home to a warm dinner on a beautifully set table, a chilled,(real) martini, and a beautiful bouquet of fresh flowers. I also feel that, since my husband has worked so hard since he was a very young boy, he deserves a little time off.

My quandary is this: Our families and most of our friends are not the types to accept this arrangement, albeit temporary, as acceptable, as he is "the man" of the house. Now, well-meaning friends and family are beginning to question me on my husband's occupational status, even going as far as offering connections. They must wonder why he has not found gainful employment immediately, since he was quite successful previously.

I am eager to find a way to tactfully explain, without making my husband sound as if he is a dead-beat, that we are in no great rush for him to become re-employed immediately. I do not want to come off as domineering or militantly feminist, as these are qualities that neither I nor my friends or family admire. Neither do I desire for these same well-intended friends or family to deny us similar regards once we decide that my dear husband's well deserved, and productive, vacation should end.

Sincere Thanks,
K.

Dear K.,

You sound Very Happy Indeed, and we only have this to say: Your Husband's Occupational Status is Absolutely NOBODY else's business. We suggest you respond, "Oh, everything is completely fine-- haven't I told you already how happy we are? Things are Just Peachy." Deflect, Deflect, Deflect. You don't owe anyone an explanation. After all, there are Plenty of Reasons why someone may be Sans Job. He may have received a Tidy Little Severance Package that would be cut off if he were to seek New Employment-- that's a Swell Arrangement, and why would anyone want to Jeopardize It? He may have inherited a Fortune from a Distant Relative; he may simply be Taking Some Time to Write a Novel, or have a Sabbatical, or just Escape the Rat Race for a Time. We think that the more you tell people that really, things are TRULY FINE, and the more they see how Happy You Are with this arrangement, they'll Get the Picture.

Best wishes,
The Etiquette Grrls

martini


Dear Etiquette Grrls,

When and where is the proper place to reapply lipstick when dining out?

Brina

Dear Brina,

In the Powder Room, and only in the Powder Room.

Cheers,
The Etiquette Grrls

martini


Dear Etiquette Grrls,

When dining out in NYC, I of course place my napkin on my lap as soon as I sit down. The problem is, with foods such as red-sauce Italian entrees, I often need to wipe my mouth. Is it acceptable to remove the napkin from my lap, wipe my mouth, then replace it in my lap? (Un peu problematic if said napkin already contains crumbs from the foccacia placed on the table before the meal begins.) It seems infinitely better than wiping my mouth with the back of my hands in front of my dining companions, n'est pas? But I am not entirely sure the former behavior is entirely correct. When eating at home, I am the type that places a napkin (paper)on her lap, PLUS, reserves an extra few napkins for the mouth wiping (occasional) shirt wiping, etc., to my side. Is it rude to ask a member of the waitstaff for an additional napkin or two in order to remedy this problem?

Thanks for any help you may be able to give!
K. in Stamford

Dear K.,

Oh, Dear Reader. You should only have one (1) napkin at Any Given Time, and it should remain On Your Lap throughout the meal, except (of course) when you are using it to Wipe Your Mouth. When you have finished Wiping Your Mouth, you must discreetly return the napkin to Your Lap. Never, ever, EVER Wipe Your Mouth avec the Back of Your Hands! That's what the napkin is There For, Dear Reader! And while eating Italian Entrees with Red Sauce can be Un Peu Messy, it becomes ever so much easier with practice. At home, you can learn to Twirl the Pasta a few strands at a time so that it doesn't Drip At All! Or order something like Penne, which is much easier to handle than, say, Linguini. And finally, if you sit down at the table and find your napkin has Crumbs in it Already from the Focaccia, simply ask Your Waiter for a New One! Easy as 1-2-3!

All best,
The Etiquette Grrls

martini


Dear Etiquette Grrls,

We must start by saying that we absolutely adore both your website and your book. We think that you are Simply Marvelous and we strive to be like you! We are looking forward to reading your new book!!

Here is our petit problem:

We are both sixteen and are going through the process of Driver's Education. The classroom lessons were not too bad, but it is the road lessons that are getting to us. The instructors are terribly rude, and the cars are a mess. We are paying $33 an hour, so shouldn't we be driving for the full hour? These instructors have us make at least one stop for coffee or food during the lesson. It seems to us as if we are paying them to let us park in a Dunkin' Donuts parking lot! As we mentioned earlier, the cars are a mess. We both recently received our first Kate Spade handbags (we both have "Claire") and we would like to keep them assez clean. However, we have found this impossible to do as the cars are covered in crumbs and dirt and we are forced to keep them on the floor in the back of the car. Would it be THOR for us to bring something to keep our bags on, and also, is it out of line to ask the instructor to actually let us drive? Please help us!

Thank you very much for taking the time to read our question, and we wish you both a happy New Year.

Sincerely,
Caroline and Kate

Dear Caroline and Kate,

Good Heavens!!! You've given the EGs a Horrible Flashback to Our Own Experiences in Driver's Ed-- Why, God, Why must it be So Bad? Both EGs spent Every Single Lesson going through Drive-Throughs, stopping for the Instructor to buy Cigarettes and Lottery Tickets, and sitting Alone in the Car, Twiddling Our Thumbs, while the Instructor dropped off a McDonald's Extra-Value Meal for Her Mother. The Classroom Lessons, at least, had Amusingly Old Movies at times, but for the most part, it was a Dreadful, Dreadful Experience. Here are Some Tips:

1) First, you're paying for these lessons. Or perhaps Your Parents Are. In either case, you deserve to get Your Money's Worth. We suggest you tell Your Parents what's going on, and see if they'll Have a Word avec the Director of the Driving School. It might only get you switched to a Different Instructor, who might be Equally Bad (which is exactly what happened to EGL), but at least you'll feel you're Letting the Boss Know what a Shoddy Operation It Is.

2) Definitely bring something to put Your Handbags on. Heck, bring something for yourself to sit on!

3) If it doesn't get any better, we have an Excellent Suggestion for Recourse. It won't improve your Driving Lessons, but we guarantee you'll feel better. You need to take Detailed Notes about Exactly How Awful these lessons are. While one of you is driving, the other one can Write. Example: "10:00. Waiting to be Picked Up. Instructor is late. AGAIN. 10:05. La-di-da, isn't it good that we pay $33 an hour for this? 10:10. Instructor finally here. Car looks as if it hasn't been washed since the Year of Its Manufacture (circa 1979). Front seat littered avec two (2) reeking, greasy KFC buckets. Mysterious dripping stain on Ceiling-- don't want to sit under that! 10:11. Kate driving. Although she asked if she could practice Three-Point Turns, Instructor says no, not until we stop by the ATM and the Convenience Store. 10:15. Instructor at ATM. Cld. Easily Steal Car. Realize would not WANT car in a Million Years. Open Windows while Instructor Gone to Air Out Fried Chicken Stench. Etc., etc., etc." Then, Dear Readers, take Your Copious Notes and develop an article for Your School Newspaper, or better yet, Your Local Newspaper, about How Atrocious Driver's Ed is, especially at the ABC Driving School. Publish it. Revel in the knowledge that you've at least prevented Lots of Others from having to Suffer Through the Same Experience.

Good luck, Dear Readers!

Sincerely yours,
The Etiquette Grrls

martini


Dear Etiquette Grrls,

When I interviewed for my job, the boss mentioned that there would (not might) be a year-end bonus... Now the new year has started - should I mention it? I interviewed in September and now it is January.

Bonusless

Dear Bonusless,

Before you do ANYTHING, make some Discreet Inquiries. Has anyone else mentioned the Bonus Program? Are you sure that by "Year-End" Your Boss meant the End of the Calendar Year and not the End of the Fiscal Year? Or the One-Year Anniversary of Your Hiring? You definitely want to be Cautious With This, Dear Reader. Also, peruse Your Contract-- is there anything about Bonuses in There? If not, then we hate to say it, but you might not actually be Getting a Bonus. If times are tough at a company, the Bonuses are usually the First Thing to Go. Even if your contract doesn't say anything about Bonuses, you also, of course, have the option of reminding Your Boss of your conversation and asking what's up with them, but make sure you've listened to everything in the Office Grapevine before you approach Your Boss. (Maybe the folks who've been there longer will simply Give You the Scoop.) If several people have similar concerns, you'll stand out less for asking. Try something like, "At lunch the other day, a few of us were talking about the company and the subject of Bonuses came up. We all remembered hearing about them when we interviewed, but no one knew if they were tied to Our Profit, or something else like Our Department's Performance... Or even when they might be given. I was wondering if you could fill me in?" Better yet, if your company has an HR department, you could ask them to clarify things without looking as if you're Pestering Your Boss for More Money, which is, in a nutshell, the Impression You Do NOT Want to Make.

Good luck, Dear Reader!

Yours very sincerely,
The Etiquette Grrls

martini


Dear Etiquette Grrls,

I'm holding a baby shower for my daughter and son-in-law. They want to include on the invitation, "Adults Only," and it just feels wrong to add that line. First, I think only adults would attend because the invitation would be addressed to them, not to their children. Secondly, I would think people have the sense not to bring their children. This is the sticking point: my daughter and son-in-law believe there are guests who WOULD bring their children. Help! And thank you very much for any assistance you can provide.

Joann

Dear Joann,

You'd think only adults would attend because the invitation had been addressed only to them, and it should be like that, but sadly, there may be Some Idiot who thinks Their Kids Deserve to Go With Them Everywhere, even to Formal Events Like Weddings, Obviously Adult-Only Events Like Cocktail Parties, etc. THIS MUST BE STOPPED! Parents: We're sure your kids are Darling and Adorable. However, you must face the fact that THERE ARE SITUATIONS WHERE THEY DO NOT BELONG, and that sometimes, people throwing a party really DON'T want Children Underfoot, even if they're NOT Screaming, or Breaking Things, or Whining.

So, what can you do? Chances are you Already Have Some People In Mind who will want to Bring Their Kids. If that's the case, put a little note in just their invitations: "We hope you can join us, but we wanted to let you know we're keeping the guest list to adults only, so you'd have plenty of time to find someone to watch Darling Little Damian."

Good luck,
The Etiquette Grrls

 

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